Suzanne Klapp Scottsdale Mayor

Scottsdale councilwomen Suzanne Klapp and Virginia Korte set the stage for potential mayoral battle in 2020

From AZCentral

Klapp is organizing her committee

Lorraine Longhi, Arizona Republic

Scottsdale City Council members Suzanne Klapp and Virginia Korte are laying the groundwork for potential runs for mayor in 2020.

Klapp filed paperwork on Wednesday to organize her candidate committee, Vote Suzanne Klapp. Klapp and Mayor Jim Lane both come to the end of their third terms in office next year.

But the move isn’t an official announcement by Klapp.

Scottsdale’s charter says incumbent council members who are not yet in the final year of their term must resign before officially declaring for office, so Klapp likely won’t make a formal announcement until January.

Scottsdale has a three-term limit for its mayor, meaning Lane will be ineligible to run again in 2020. The earliest that a mayoral candidate can submit petitions to run is spring.

“It’s just a required document in order for me to start talking to people about the mayor’s race,” Klapp said of the filing. “All it shows is that I’m considering the mayor’s race in 2020.”

Klapp owned a custom picture framing business in north Scottsdale before retiring a year-and-a-half ago. She began her first term on the council in January 2009 and was re-elected to a third term that began in January 2017. She served as chair of the council’s audit committee for 10 years.

“I think term limits are good and 12 years as a councilwoman is sufficient,” Klapp said. “I do enjoy the job, but my opportunity now is to look at running for mayor.”

Mayor Jim Lane, who also is term-limited, told The Arizona Republic he encouraged Klapp to run for mayor.

“It’s time for someone else to give it a shot,” he said. “I feel confident that there are folks who are thinking about it who will do a good job.”

Scottsdale Councilwoman Virginia Korte has been a vocal supporter of a non-discrimination ordinance.

Crowded mayor’s race?
Scottsdale Councilwoman Virginia Korte last year also announced her intent to run, saying she wanted to start early to form an exploratory committee and to speak with constituents before announcing a campaign.

“For nearly 30 years, I have dedicated myself to helping maintain our wonderful quality of life. I have always worked to put Scottsdale first,” Korte said at the time.

She said Thursday she is still exploring running for mayor.

Korte, whose term is also up in 2020, also would wait until January to officially announce a run. Korte is only in her second term on the council and would be eligible to run for a third term if she changes tack next year.She was elected to the City Council in 2012 and won re-election in 2016.

Korte was named to the board of directors of the Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce in 1996, where she later served as president and CEO. She later served as President and CEO of Scottsdale Training and Rehabilitation Services (STARS) until 2014.

Both Korte and Klapp have websites detailing their intentions to run for mayor.

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Will a third candidate enter the race?
Other potential mayoral candidates haven’t yet stepped forward, but the council members are not counting out a dark-horse candidate.

After the lightning-rod Proposition 420 gained strong support from Scottsdale residents last year, Lane said he would not be surprised if a prominent figure associated with Prop. 420 also announced a campaign.

The citizen’s initiative was tied to stopping commercial development in the city’s McDowell Sonoran Preserve, 30,000 acres of pristine desert.

Klapp said, “I applauded the efforts of the Yes on 420 campaign and certainly would not stand in their way if one of them wanted to run.”

But she says the experience afforded by being a council member is invaluable, citing all there is to know about city ordinances, rules and regulations and the budget process.

“Without council experience, it’s difficult to grasp the aspects of what the job entails,” Klapp said.

 

Read the full article here.

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